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"The current Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) level for BPA is adequately justified."
German Society for Toxicology, April 2011
"The highest estimates for aggregated exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources are 3 to 5 times lower than the TDI, depending on the age group."
EFSA fact sheet, January 2015
"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"The current Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) level for BPA is adequately justified."
German Society for Toxicology, April 2011
"BPA poses no health risk to consumers of any age group at current exposure levels"
EFSA press release January 2015
"Receipts containing BPA do not pose a risk to consumers or cashiers"
Danish EPA, June 2011
"[…] the scientific evidence at this time does not suggest that the very low levels of human exposure to BPA through the diet are unsafe."
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), March 2012
"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010

Legislation

Bisphenol A has been studied, tested and safely used for over 50 years. Health authorities in Europe and around the world have confirmed and authorised the safe use of BPA and materials based on BPA such as polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins.

In the EU, except for baby bottles, BPA-based materials are approved for all intended uses . This applies as well to the vast majority of the  other global regions.

Since 2006, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) conducted several scientific assessments on BPA. In each case EFSA reaffirmed that there is no concern for human health from BPA: human exposure to BPA is far below the safe intake level, and even lower than previously estimated (EFSA 2013). In its final assessment on BPA published in January 2015, based on a comprehensive review of over 450 recent studies related to potential health hazards associated with BPA, EFSA concludes: There is no consumer health risk from BPA exposure.

According to the European Chemicals Regulation REACH, Bisphenol A is not a  Substance of Very High Concern (SVHC).

The European Commission´s Risk Assessment of Bisphenol A investigated potential risks to human health as well as to the environment. It found that BPA and BPA-based materials  are safe in its intended uses. 

Nevertheless, based on a highly precautionary approach, the European Commission at an earlier stage had decided to restrict one specific BPA-based application: Since 1 June 2011, the production and sale of BPA-based polycarbonate baby bottles is no longer permitted under European law. The decision is not a consequence of any evidence of adverse effects from BPA. It was taken after the market for polycarbonate baby bottles in Europe had virtually disappeared.

Some European countries established further restrictions on the use of BPA-based materials in food contact plastics applications. These restrictions are in conflict with the EU law.

More information on Bisphenol A

Updated 01/2014