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"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"The current Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) level for BPA is adequately justified."
German Society for Toxicology, April 2011
"The current Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) level for BPA is adequately justified."
German Society for Toxicology, April 2011
"An adequate margin of safety exists for BPA at current levels of exposure from food contact uses, for infants and adults"
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), January 2010
"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"The current Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) level for BPA is adequately justified."
German Society for Toxicology, April 2011
"The highest estimates for aggregated exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources are 3 to 5 times lower than the TDI, depending on the age group."
EFSA fact sheet, January 2015

Legislation

In Europe – and beyond – chemical substances such as Bisphenol A (BPA) are subject to regulations that guarantee a high level of protection of human health and the environment.

In the European Union (EU), the manufacture and use of chemical substances – including BPA – must comply with a comprehensive legislative framework.  REACH is the Regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals and constitutes the framework legislation on chemicals in the EU (Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006). The CLP Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 is the European Regulation on Classification, Labelling and Packaging of chemical substances and mixtures. The CLP ensures that hazards presented by chemical substances and mixtures are clearly communicated to workers and consumers in the EU through classification and labelling. >> More on BPA and REACH & related processes

In addition, a network of product-specific legislations exists in Europe which sets out requirements for the use of chemical substances in different products (e.g. food packaging and containers, medical devices, cosmetics, toys etc.). It is there to ensure a high level of protection of human health while supporting an effective functioning of the internal market. >> More on Food Contact Regulation

In the EU, except for baby bottles, BPA-based materials are approved for all intended uses. This applies as well to the vast majority of the other global regions. Authorities around the world have repeatedly investigated and confirmed the safety of BPA in its intended applications. Some European countries however established national restrictions on the use of BPA-based materials in food contact plastics applications with respect to babies and small children. These national restrictions go beyond harmonised EU legislation. Since January 2015, France enforced a national restriction on the use of BPA in all food contact materials. The measure, covering multiple applications from polycarbonate water coolers to epoxy-lined drinks cans, contravenes EU-wide rules for plastics in food contact materials, and is in conflict with the 2015 EFSA opinion. >> More on national measures within EU and globally

 

* Please note that the website is currently being updated