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"An adequate margin of safety exists for BPA at current levels of exposure from food contact uses, for infants and adults"
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), January 2010
"The highest estimates for aggregated exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources are 3 to 5 times lower than the TDI, depending on the age group."
EFSA fact sheet, January 2015
"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"The highest estimates for aggregated exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources are 3 to 5 times lower than the TDI, depending on the age group."
EFSA fact sheet, January 2015
"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"An adequate margin of safety exists for BPA at current levels of exposure from food contact uses, for infants and adults"
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), January 2010
"BPA poses no health risk to consumers of any age group at current exposure levels"
EFSA press release January 2015
"Studies pursued by FDA's National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) have shown no effects of BPA from low-dose exposure"
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website 2015

Migration of Bisphenol-A (BPA)

During the chemical process of polymerisation, bisphenol A (BPA) reacts and becomes firmly bound into the structure, thus actually building the polymer material. More than 99% of all BPA produced worldwide is converted into polymers.

Like with any chemical process, unavoidable trace levels of BPA (so-called free or residual BPA) can occur in the final polymer. The amount of free BPA in the polymer, however, does not play a key role in the question of BPA-migration. This is because in many cases the dominant mechanism responsible for the release of BPA from the polymer surface into the contacting aqueous liquid is hydrolysis, not the amount of free BPA monomer.

Several high quality migration studies on BPA, which included daily use conditions such as heating, microwaving, machine-dishwashing, rinsing, sterilising, have repeatedly shown that migration from BPA-based polycarbonate is very low and far below the safety levels set by the authorities. It does not pose a health risk to the consumer under normal handling and use of the products.

For example, a person weighing 60kg would have to consume every day of his/her entire life more than 300 l of water from a polycarbonate water dispenser, only to reach the level established as safe by the EFSA.

In fact, scientific studies have proved that trace amounts of BPA that might enter the human body are rapidly "metabolised" into an inactive kind of sugar, which is excreted from the body a day with no detrimental health effect.

More information:

* Please note that the website is currently being updated