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"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"Levels of BPA in the human body are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated."
World Health Organization (WHO), November 2010
"Studies pursued by FDA's National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) have shown no effects of BPA from low-dose exposure"
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website 2015
"The highest estimates for aggregated exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources are 3 to 5 times lower than the TDI, depending on the age group."
EFSA fact sheet, January 2015
"BPA poses no health risk to consumers of any age group at current exposure levels"
EFSA press release January 2015
"An adequate margin of safety exists for BPA at current levels of exposure from food contact uses, for infants and adults"
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), January 2010
"The highest estimates for aggregated exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources are 3 to 5 times lower than the TDI, depending on the age group."
EFSA fact sheet, January 2015
"Studies pursued by FDA's National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) have shown no effects of BPA from low-dose exposure"
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website 2015

Bisphenol-A in Polycarbonates

Polycarbonate plastic is the main use for bisphenol A (BPA), accounting for nearly 70% of total BPA production. Polycarbonate plastic is often selected because of its unique combination of properties, such as clarity, durability, safety, versatility and its heat and shatter-resistance, which are critical for many applications, such as spectacle lenses or medical equipment.

Some of the common applications of polycarbonate plastic include:

  • CDs, DVDs, Blu-Ray and other discs
  • Roof lights
  • Covers for solar panels
  • Security glazing, e.g. transparent cabins for ski lifts
  • Roof modules in cars
  • Safety goggles and protective visors
  • Helmets
  • Sunglasses
  • Reusable water bottles
  • Roofs of sport stadiums
  • Safety hats
 
  • Medical equipment (blood oxygenators, respirators, dialysers, single-use operating instruments)
  • Housings for electronic equipment (cell phones, cameras, hairdryers, computers, TVs, coffee makers)
  • Electrical kettles
  • Plug connectors
  • Electrical equipment, such as plug connections or switches
  • Headlamps and bumpers in cars
  • Conservatory or green house glazing

 

For more information on applications, please download our fact sheet on applications.


* Please note that the website is currently being updated