Close Menu

SAFETY OF BISPHENOL A

Authorities around the world have repeatedly investigated and confirmed the safety of Bisphenol A (BPA) in its intended applications.

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China (NHFPC), the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Health Canada, the WHO and many more regulatory agencies worldwide concluded, based on the weight of the large amount of scientific evidence, that there is no human health concern from this chemical intermediate if used as intended.

What the European authorities say – No consumer health risk from BPA exposure

In January 2015, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published its most recent comprehensive scientific opinion on the safety of BPA. It combines the authority‘s assessment of both exposure and health aspects and considers comments received from national authorities and stakeholders following extensive engagement and consultation. EFSA concluded that there is no consumer health risk from dietary BPA exposure.

 

What the American authorities say – BPA is safe at the current levels occurring in foods

The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) regularly reviews the safety of BPA exposure from food contact materials.

Its current perspective is that, based on its most recent safety assessment, BPA is safe at the current levels occurring in foods. 

Based on FDA’s ongoing safety review of scientific evidence, the available information continues to support the safety of BPA for the currently approved uses in food containers and packaging.

What the Canadian authorities say – Current dietary exposure to BPA through food packaging uses is not expected to pose a health risk

In 2012, Health Canada conducted a probabilistic exposure assessment based on a number of additional surveys.

It concluded that the updated dietary exposure assessments are lower than those estimated in the earlier assessment in August 2008.

Therefore, based on the overall weight of evidence, the findings of the previous assessment remained unchanged and Health Canada's Food Directorate continued to conclude that current dietary exposure to BPA through food packaging uses is not expected to pose a health risk to the general population, including newborns and young children.

What the Chinese authorities say – BPA is safe and approved to use in the production of food packages, containers and coatings

In May 2011, China´s National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China (NHFPC) concluded that the migration of BPA from food contact materials is very low and it did not find a negative influence to human health from these uses.

The use of BPA is considered safe and has been approved in the use of food contact materials, except for baby bottles.